ASC Mathematical Literacy

R1,200.00 incl

 

The competencies developed through Mathematical Literacy allow individuals to make sense of, participate in and contribute to the twenty-first century world.  This world is characterised by numbers, numerically based arguments and data represented and misrepresented in many different ways. Such competencies include the ability to reason, make decisions, solve problems, manage resources, and interpret information.

To familiarise yourself with the curriculum outline in more detail, please click on the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) as per the Department of Education.

 

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Description

The competencies developed through Mathematical Literacy allow individuals to make sense of, participate in and contribute to the twenty-first century world.  This world is characterised by numbers, numerically based arguments and data represented and misrepresented in many different ways. Such competencies include the ability to reason, make decisions, solve problems, manage resources, and interpret information. Learners must be exposed to both mathematical content and real-life contexts to develop these competencies. The subject Mathematical Literacy should enable the learner to become a self-managing person, a contributing worker and a participating citizen in a developing democracy. The teaching and learning of Mathematical Literacy should thus provide opportunities to analyse problems and devise ways to work mathematically in solving such problems.

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Additional information

Learning Aims:

There are five key elements of Mathematical Literacy:

1. Mathematical Literacy involves the use of elementary mathematical content. The mathematical content of Mathematical Literacy is limited to those elementary mathematical concepts that are relevant to making sense of numerically based scenarios faced in the everyday lives of individuals. In general, the focus is not on abstract mathematical concepts.
2. Mathematical Literacy involves authentic real-life contexts. In exploring and solving real-world problems, it is essential that the contexts learners are exposed to in this subject are authentic (i.e. are drawn from genuine and realistic situations) and relevant. Wherever possible, learners must be able to work with actual real-life problems and resources, rather than with problems developed around constructed, semi-real, contrived and fictitious scenarios.
3. Mathematical Literacy involves solving familiar and unfamiliar problems. It is unrealistic to expect that in the teaching of Mathematical Literacy, learners will always be exposed to contexts that are specifically relevant to their lives. Rather, the purpose of this subject is to equip learners with the necessary knowledge and skills to be able to solve problems in any context that they may encounter in daily life.
4. Mathematical Literacy involves decision making and communication. A mathematically literate individual is able to weigh up options by comparing solutions and making decisions regarding the most appropriate choice for a given set of conditions. In the teaching of Mathematical Literacy, teachers should provide learners with opportunities to develop and practise decision-making and communication skills.
5. Mathematical Literacy involves the use of integrated content and skills in solving problems. Problems encountered in everyday contexts are never structured according to personal content topics. Rather, the solving of real-life problems commonly involves the use of content and skills drawn from a range of topics. Therefore, being able to solve problems based on real-life contexts requires the ability to identify and use a wide variety of techniques and skills integrated from across a range of content topics.